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Undergraduate

CHEM 100 Introduction to the Profession

Introduction to the chemical sciences, scientific method, computing tools, and interrelations of chemical sciences with biology, physics and other professions. 2-0-2 (C)


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CHEM 122 Principles of Chemistry I (No Lab)

Foundations of chemistry, atoms and molecules, stoichiometry of chemical reactions, thermochemistry, properties of gases, states of matter, chemical solutions, kinetics. Molecular basis for chemical reactivity; atomic structure, periodicity, chemical bonding. Same as CHEM 124 except without the laboratory. 3-0-3

CHEM 124 Principles of Chemistry I

Foundations of chemistry, atoms and molecules, stoichiometry of chemical reactions, thermochemistry, properties of gases, states of matter, chemical solutions, kinetics. Molecular basis for chemical reactivity; atomic structure, periodicity, chemical bonding. 3-3-4 (C)

CHEM 125 Principles of Chemistry II

Chemical equilibria, the chemistry of acids and bases, solubility and precipitation reactions. Introduction to thermodynamics and electrochemistry. Chemistry of selected elements and their compounds. 3-3-4 (C)

CHEM 126 Principles of Chemistry II (No Lab)

Same as CHEM 125 except without the laboratory. 3-0-3

CHEM 237 Organic Chemistry I

The constitution and properties of the different classes of organic compounds, with considerable attention to stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, synthetic organic and bio-organic chemistry, and spectroscopy. The laboratory work involves an introduction to the major synthetic and analytical techniques of organic chemistry including the preparation of representative organic compounds and the isolation of compounds from natural sources. 3-4-4 (C)

CHEM 239 Organic Chemistry II

Sequel to Organic Chemistry I. Constitution and properties of organic compounds at a fundamental level. Introduction to biological materials and synthetic polymers. 3-0-3

CHEM 240 Organic Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory part of CHEM 239. Techniques for advanced organic preparations. Identification and characterization of organic compounds, including modern instrumental methods. 1-4-2 (C)

CHEM 247 Analytical Chemistry

Introduction to the theory and applications of analytical chemistry. Laboratory emphasis on obtaining and interpreting quantitative data. Statistical data analysis, equilibrium expressions, pH, volumetric and gravimetric analysis, fundamentals of spectroscopy, fundamentals of electrochemistry, and analytical separations. Laboratory experiments include acid-base behavior, potentiometry with ion-specific electrodes, spectroscopy (UV-visible and atomic absorption), and chromatography (ion-exchange, high pressure liquid, and gas-liquid). 2-4-3 (C)

CHEM 321 Instrumental Analysis

Theory and application of modern instruments in chemical procedures. Standard spectroscopic methods including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and ultraviolet spectroscopy. Separation techniques using high pressure liquid chromatography and gas chromatography. Other topics relevant to advanced chemical instrumentation will also be covered. 2-6-4 (C)

CHEM 343 Physical Chemistry I

Equations of state; kinetic molecular theory; temperature dependent enthalpies and heat capacities of chemical compounds and of chemical reactions; entropy and the Gibbs free energy; chemical equilibrium; phases with variable composition; solutions of charged particles; surface phenomena. 3-0-3

CHEM 344 Physical Chemistry II

Quantum theory, molecular structure and spectroscopy, chemical equilibrium constants from statistical mechanics, phenomemological and mechanistic chemical reaction kinetics, transport phenomena from molecular perspective. The laboratory will include experiments dealing with gases, thermochemistry, liquid solutions, phase equilibria, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, spectra, molecular structure and treatment of data. 3-4-4 (C)

CHEM 410 Science of Climate Change

How can we continue to lead the good life while living in harmony with nature? Anthropogenic–based climate change needs to be addressed. Commercial/political aspects are not considered here. Thus our focus is on the science underlying global warming/climate change. Ultimately the sun is our primary source of power. How do we responsibly access that power in the short, intermediate and long terms? Biofuels, Carbon Dioxide, Polar Ice Caps, and Solar Power are some of the topics to be discussed. Class time will be divided between lectures and recitation. 1-2-3

CHEM 415 Inorganic Chemistry

In-depth introduction to the vast subfield of the discipline dealing with all field of the discipline dealing with all of the elements in the periodic table Presents balanced blend of facts and theories in modern inorganic chemistry. Emphasis is on bonding, electronic, magnetic, and structural features exhibited by inorganic and organometallic compounds and their reactivities. Modern concepts including symmetry and group theory and their relevance in solving chemical problems. Bioinorganic chemistry, and high tech" inorganic " materials and solids are introduced. 3-0-3

CHEM 416 Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

An advanced laboratory with emphasis on synthesis and characterization of inorganic and organometallic compounds. 1-7-3 (C)

CHEM 434 Spectroscopic Methods in Identification and Analysis

Characterization and analysis by mass, vibrational, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electronic spectroscopy. Structure spectra correlations applied to organic and inorganic compounds with examples drawn from diverse areas, e.g., pollutants, toxic materials, polymers, etc. 2-0-2

CHEM 445 Physical Chemistry III

Quantum theory, molecular structure and spectroscopy, chemical equilibrium constants from statistical mechanics, phenomemological and mechanistic chemical reaction kinetics, transport phenomena from molecular perspective. 3-0-3

CHEM 450 Introduction to Research

Required for chemistry majors. Designed to give research experience in a faculty research laboratory. 0-8-3 (C)

CHEM 451 Modern Techniques in Chemical Literature

A guide to the use of traditional and automated methods for the storage and retrieval of chemical information. 2-0-2

CHEM 454 Chemical Modeling and Simulations

A numerical methods and computer applications course for chemists; emphasis on software rather than hardware; results of numerical analysis and linear algebra presented and applied to solution of chemical problems. 3-0-3

CHEM 455 Advanced Organic Chemistry

A survey of organic name reactions and modern reagents for organic synthesis with an emphasis on their utility in multistep synthesis. 3-0-3

CHEM 470 Introduction to Polymer Chemistry

Basic introduction to Polymer Science. The course will cover basics of polymer nomenclature, synthesis, characterization, and the relationship between polymer structures and properties. Examples of major applications of polymeric materials including biopolymers will be presented. 3-0-3

CHEM 485 Chemistry Colloquium

This course may not be used to satisfy the natural sciences general education requirement. Lectures by prominent scientists. This course exposes students to current and active research in chemistry both within and outside the IIT community. It helps prepare students for a career in research. It is complementary to the academic courses and provides examples of professional/scientific presentations. This course may not be used to satisfy the natural science general education requirement. 1-0-1

CHEM 487 Senior Thesis in Chemistry

Original work carried on by the student under the guidance of a staff member. A careful search of the literature is required before the study is begun, and continued reference to the chemical literature is expected as the work progresses. A written report is required. 0-12-4 (C)

CHEM 497 Special Projects

For juniors and seniors. (Credit: Variable) (C)


Graduate

CHEM 500 Advanced Analytical Chemistry

An overview of analytical chemistry with discussions of complex ionic equilibria, electroanalytical techniques including potentiometric, voltametric, coulometric and conductometric methods, ion chromatography, capillary electrophoresis and sensor technology. 3-0-3


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CHEM 505 Spectroscopic Methods I

Theories of spectroscopic transitions and their applications in structural elucidations and quantitative analysis. Topics include ultraviolet/visible, infrared, Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. 3-0-3

CHEM 506 Sampling and Sample Preparation

Techniques and devices for sampling in diverse media will be treated, followed by a discussion of sample treatment prior to analysis including isolation, concentration and fractionation of analytes and classes of analytes. 3-0-3

CHEM 508 Analytical Methods Development

In this seminar-based course, the students will learn about developing analytical methods for samples in complex matrices with emphasis on total method development and validation. 2-0-2

CHEM 509 Physical Methods of Charaterization

A survey of physical methods of characterization including x-ray diffraction and fluorescence surface techniques including SEM, TEM, AES and ESCA, thermal methods and synchrotron radiation methods. 3-0-3

CHEM 511 Project Management

Introduction to concepts and techniques used to design and/or analyze a project to develop a set of tasks to accomplish the project, to coordinate and to monitor the work involved in the tasks, and to deliver a final product or service. Budgetary considerations will also be discussed. 2-0-2

CHEM 512 Spectroscopic Methods II

A continuation of the study of optical methods covering atomic absorption spectroscopy, atomic and flame emission spectroscopy, chemiluminescence, fluorescence, phosphorescence, light scattering and refractometry. 2-0-2

CHEM 513 Statistics for Analytical Chemists

A survey providing sufficient statistical background for scientists. The topics covered include probability, statistics, sampling estimation, regression analysis, experimental design, data analysis and signal enhancement. 3-0-3

CHEM 515 Gas Chromatography - Theory and Practice

This course will cover theory and concepts of gas chromatographic analysis and its practical application in solving analytical problems. Topics include basic theory of chromatographic separation, separation dynamics, instrumentation, column selection, quantitative techniques, and practical applications. 3-0-3

CHEM 516 Liquid Chromatography - Theory and Practice

This course will cover the operating principles and applications of state-of-the-art LC/HPLC instrumentation and analysis. Topics include basic theory of liquid chromatography, instrumentation, optimization of LC separation, quantitative techniques, and the diverse range of analytical applications amenable to LC analysis. Prerequisite CHEM 515. 3-0-3

CHEM 518 Understanding ICH Quality Guidelines

The International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) was revolutionized in the 1980's to provide a forum for the pharmaceutical industry to discuss regulatory requirements for registering new chemical entities. These guidelines have significantly influenced the content of FDA draft guidelines to develop scientific information and manufacturing controls. Proper understanding of these guidelines is essential in the drug development process. This course will focus exclusively on guidelines associated with the registration of small molecules. Students will gain an understanding of the expectations set forth in various FDA and ICH quality topics, in order to implement these guidelines and/or engage the regulatory agencies in dialogue to provide justification of data or present clear scientific rationale. 3-0-3

CHEM 519 Good Manufacturing Practices

This course is designed to educate students in the area of pharmaceutical regulatory science. Students will learn about Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) that are essential to the pharmaceutical industry under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, 21 CFR (code of federal regulations). This course covers an introduction to current GMP regulations, and their implication to different areas of pharmaceutical manufacturing, such as laboratory records, equipment and facilities, and personnel. Students will learn to recognize regulatory actions along with the financial risks for non-compliance. This course is available online, and is beneficial for exploring a possible new career path, or to acquire a better understanding of regulatory science. 3-0-3

CHEM 520 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Selective treatment of the chemistries of main group and transition elements with emphasis on coordination complexes, organometallic compounds and inorganic cages and clusters. Discussions of molecular symmetry, stereochemistry, bonding, electronic spectra, magnetic properties, reactions, kinetics and reaction mechanisms are included. 3-0-3

CHEM 521 Inorganic Solid State and Materials Chemistry

This course coers structure and bonding and structure-property relationships in inorganic molecules and solids, descriptions of inorganic solids, crystal structures, and properties of inorganic materials. 3-0-3

CHEM 522 Efficient Chemical and Materials Synthesis

Environmentally benign chemical pathways. High-yield and zero-waste chemical processes. Sustainability, representative industrial chemical processes, catalytic chemistry. 3-0-3

CHEM 524 Synthesis and Intellectual Property Management

This course focuses on the management of intellectual property. Professionals will lead discussions on the control and dissemination of materials concerning intellectual property. This will be combined with technical presentations by the students in the classroom. Topics of discussion will include invention disclosures, intellectual property rights, proprietary materials, justification for patents, types of patents, terms of a patent, patents procedure, licensing procedure and security considerations. Access to patented materials and disclosure of materials under patent process will be covered. 2-0-2

CHEM 530 Organic Reactions and Mechanisms

A study of important mechanism classes and their relationship to the major reactions of organic chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the study of reaction intermediates and on the methods used to characterize reaction pathways. Topics will include aromatic compounds, reduction, oxidation, regiochemistry, stereochemistry, addition, elimination and substitution reactions, carbanion chemistry, free radical reactions, ring synthesis, concerted reactions, protecting groups, disconnection approach, and named reactions. Prerequisite: CHEM 455 or instructor's consent. 3-0-3

CHEM 531 Tactics in Organic Synthesis

A study of modern synthetic strategies used in the preparation of complex organic molecules. Synthetic planning using the disconnection approach and the selection of reagents to solve regiochemical and stereochemical problems will be the underlying themes. Synthetic strategies to be discussed include tandem reactions, template and chelation effects, biomimetic tactics and the use of chiral terpenes, carbohydrates and amino acids in enantioselective syntheses. Target molecules will include natural products, pharmaceuticals and "smart" organic materials. Prerequisite: CHEM 530. 3-0-3

CHEM 535 Polymer Synthesis

In-depth study of polymer synthesis, kinetics of polymerization, solution and thermal properties, processing and characterization techniques and rheological behavior. Selected topics include high-performance polymers, conducting polymers, electrooptical polymers, water-soluble polymers, biopolymers, medicinal polymers, photosensitive polymers and liquid crystalline polymers. Prerequisite: CHEM 470 or instructor's consent. 3-0-3

CHEM 537 Polymer Chemistry Laboratory

This course will include the synthesis of a variety of polymers and their characterization using instrumental methods. Emphasis will be placed on factors that control polymer formation, methods for obtaining molecular weights and distributions of polymers, as well as thermal and mechanical characteristics of polymers. Prerequisite: CHEM 470 or instructor's consent. 1-6-3

CHEM 538 Physical Biochemistry

The principles and techniques of physical chemistry applied to proteins, nucleic acids, polysaccharides and lipids. Prerequisites: CHEM 239, CHEM 344 (or equivalent). 3-0-3

CHEM 539 Introduction to Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Fundamental concepts will be discussed, including modern principles of drug design; drug absorption, distribution and metabolism; theories of drug-receptor interactions; approaches to structure-activity relationships; chemical, physicochemical and structural considerations. The various classes of therapeutic agents will be surveyed with emphasis on possible modes of action. Methods of synthesis will be considered. Prerequisite: CHEM 239. 3-0-3

CHEM 542 Polymer Characterization and Analysis

Overview of various characterization and analysis techniques in polymer science and technology such as thermal analysis, mechanical property measurements, chromatographic separations, techniques for the determination of molecular weights and chemical analysis of polymer additive in polymer research, product development, quality control and degradation studies. A general discussion on industrial problem solvgin using multiple characterization techniques. 3-0-3

CHEM 543 Analytical Chemistry in Pharmaceutical Laboratories

This course is designed to compliment the current curriculum of the professional master's degree in analytical chemistry. It is a review of the requirements a student may face as a professional chemist in a regulated industry. The course focus is on the requirements and common topics facing today's pharmaceutical industry. While individual agencies have specific regulations, the fundamental ideas of these regulations are largely consistent across the board. For example, an analytical chemist versed in Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) under FDA can quickly pick up the GLP's required by EPA. 2-0-2

CHEM 544 Colloids and Colloid Analysis

This course will begin a general overview of colloid science. This part of the course will introduce various types of colloids, touch on factors and conditions leading to their stability or instability, consider their evolution and will include a very limited discussion of the conditions under which they can form. The second part of the course will consist of a series of discussions of specific analytical techniques used to characterize colloidal systems, with particular emphasis on the physical characterization of the dispersed phase. 2-0-2

CHEM 550 Quantum Chemistry

Postulatory basis of quantum mechanics. Applications to molecules and band theory, and to interpretation of bond formation via spectroscopy. Range of models from 1-D rectangular well to complex molecules. Approximation methods such as Moller-Plesset Perturbation Theory, and Density Functional Theory, and their application to estimation of physical properties of complex molecules including transition states in reaction mechanisms and simulation. Prerequisite: CHEM 344 or instructor's consent. 3-0-3

CHEM 552 Chemical Kinetics

Types of reactions, reaction order, activation energy, transition states, isotope effects and the mechanism of reactions. Determination of the rates of free radical reactions. Primary processes in thermal, photochemical and other radiation-induced reactions. Prerequisites: CHEM 550, CHEM 553 (or equivalent). 3-0-3

CHEM 553 Introduction to Chemical Thermodynamics

Fundamental laws of thermodynamics; application to simple chemical systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 344 or equivalent. 3-0-3

CHEM 560 Advanced Chemistry Projects

Advanced chemistry projects to be carried out under the direction of a faculty member. These projects may involve computational, theoretical, experimental work or a combination of these. Projects based on experimental work may be carried out in the research lab of the instructor. Topics of the advanced projects will be selected by the faculty member offering the course and will not necessarily be related to the dissertation topic of the student. May be taken more than once. Credit: Variable up to 4

CHEM 584 Graduate Seminar in Chemistry

To foster scientific communications skills, students are required to present seminars based on the scientific literature. Required of all first year M.S. and Ph.D students. 1-0-1

CHEM 585 Chemistry Colloquium

Lectures by invited scientists in areas of chemistry generally not covered in the department. Must be taken two times by M.S. students and four times by Ph.d. students.1-0-1

CHEM 591 Thesis Research

(Credit: Variable)

CHEM 594 Special Problems

Designed for non-thesis M.S. only. (Credit: Variable)

CHEM 597 Reading and Special Problems

Independent study to meet the special needs of graduate students in department-approved graduate degree programs. Requires the written consent of the instructor. May be taken more than once. Receives a letter grade. (Credit: Variable)

CHEM 610 Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry

Topics of current interest in analytical chemistry including advanced electro-chemistry, surface spectroscopy of electrode surfaces, separations, laboratory automation and new spectroscopic techniques. 2-0-2

CHEM 611 Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry

Topics of current interest in analytical chemistry including advanced electro-chemistry, surface spectroscopy of electrode surfaces, separations, laboratory automation and new spectroscopic techniques. 2-0-2

CHEM 620 Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Topics of current interest in inorganic chemistry, including organometallic chemistry, homogeneous catalysis, inorganic reaction mechanisms, inorganic stereochemistry, materials chemistry, x-ray crystallography, synthetic and physical methods in inorganic and materials chemistry and chemical applications of group theory. 2-0-2

CHEM 621 Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Topics of current interest in inorganic chemistry, including organometallic chemistry, homogeneous catalysis, inorganic reaction mechanisms, inorganic stereochemistry, materials chemistry, x-ray crystallography, synthetic and physical methods in inorganic and materials chemistry and chemical applications of group theory. 2-0-2

CHEM 630 Special Topics in Organic Chemistry

Topics of current interest in organic chemistry including photochemistry, fluorine chemistry, heterocyclic chemistry, pharmaceutical chemistry and electrooptical organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 531. 2-0-2

CHEM 631 Special Topics in Organic Chemistry

Topics of current interest in organic chemistry including photochemistry, flourine chemistry, heterocyclic chemistry, pharmaceutical chemistry and electrooptical organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 531. 2-0-2

CHEM 635 Heterocyclic Chemistry

Of the vast array of structures which organic compounds adopt, many contain ring systems as a component. When the ring is made up of carbon and at least one other element, the compound is classified as a heterocycle. The aims of this course are to identify the effects that the presence of such ring systems have on the chemistry of a molecule; to show how the rings can be made, and to describe some of the uses of the compounds in organic synthesis, in medicine and in other contexts. The chemistry of aromatic five-, six- and seven-membered ring compounds with one or more nitrogen, oxygen and/or sulfur atoms will be emphasized. Prerequisite: CHEM 531. 3-0-3

CHEM 650 Special Topics in Physical Chemistry

Topics of current interest in physical chemistry, including atmospheric chemistry, ion molecule reactions, laser chemistry, theories of gas phase reactions, scattering theory, interaction of radiation with matter and time-dependent relaxation methods. 2-0-2

CHEM 651 Special Topics in Physical Chemistry

Topics of current interests in physical chemistry, including atmospheric chemistry, ion molecule reactions, laser chemistry, theories of gas phase reactions, scattering theory, interaction of radiation with matter and time-dependent relaxation methods. 2-0-2

CHEM 684 Graduate Seminars in Chemistry

To foster scientific communications skills, students are required to present seminars based on the scientific literature. Required of all Ph.D. students who have passed the written qualifying examination. 1-0-1

CHEM 685 Chemistry Colloquium

Lectures by invited scientists in areas of chemistry generally not covered in the department. 1-0-1

CHEM 691 Ph.D. Thesis Research

(Credit: Variable)